I Want to Sell My House But the Legal Stuff Frightens Me

This is the statement I am presented with the most by those enlightened souls who are thinking about heading down the sell your own home path.

And my response never changes…

“The legal side of it is a piece of cake. That is why your creator invented lawyers and conveyancers.”

Even if you hire an agent, carriage of the contract will be (should be) handled by a trained property lawyer or conveyancer.

If you choose to sell your house without an agent, not much changes.

The legal side of it is a piece of cake. That is why your creator invented lawyers and conveyancers.

The key is a little bit of preparation.

Simply follow these steps and you will be wondering what you were worried about in the first place.

  1. Before listing your home or property for sale, engage the services of a property lawyer, conveyancer or settlement agent.
  2. Ask them to prepare draft contracts and any lawfully required disclosures or documents that a buyer has a right to be aware of and see during the sale process. (Contract formats and required documents vary from State to State)
  3. If you are selling a unit/apartment/townhouse that come under a Body Corporate Scheme you must get the Body Corporate Manager to supply you with the relevant disclosures pertaining to contributions and outgoings, as well as any other matter affecting the BC.
  4. Once you strike a deal with the lucky buyer, take down all the buyers’ details and the deal you have agreed upon (Agent in a Box supplies a guide to record offer details) and forward them to your legal representative so they can create and execute the contract.
  5. Your legal rep should have, or at least access to, a trust account to hold deposit monies on behalf of you and the buyer.
  6. In conjunction with your legal rep, keep track of important dates for any conditions to be met by the buyers and work cooperatively toward the settlement date.

Taking on the sale of your own home might be a brave step for some, but it becomes easier as you see pieces fall into place.

(I say to everyone – “Just follow our bouncing ball and you can’t go wrong!”)

However, some braver souls believe they can handle the legal side of the sale on their own.

To this I have one word to say, “DON’T.”

Marketing, negotiating and selling your home is the easy part.

Always leave the ‘legals’ to the experts.

A trusted legal rep with great communication skills is worth their weight in gold to ensure your sale goes through with a minimum of fuss.

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9 Positive Buying Signals to Look Out for When You Sell Your Own Home

In my last post I shared the 8 signs that can tell you that a ‘buyer’ ain’t buying.

We all have high hopes for every prospective buyer that walks through the door.

“Is this the one?”

“Will they like it?”

“Will they like it enough to make an offer?”

What are the tell-tale signs that a buyer is seriously warming to your place?

For you to be able to pick up serious interest/buying signals you have to SWITCH-ON.

By switch on, I mean ramp up the voltage on your eyes and ears, and basically shut down your mouth.

You are going to watch for body language and listen to what they have to say, not just to you, but also who-ever is with them. Most buyers have a habit of thinking out loud. They can’t help it.

Here are the 9 signs that indicate the buyer(s) inspecting your property are taking more than a fleeting interest.

  1. They start placing their furniture in different rooms. “Oh, the dining table would fit nicely there, and we can look onto the bush while we eat.”
  2. They ask, “What are the neighbours like?” Nobody wants to live next door to the local Bandido Bikie Chapter or someone with seven screaming kids. This can be case of ‘the house suits, butwhat about the street?’
  3. They produce the tape measure to see if the fridge will fit. This IS one of the biggest deals to a buyer. If their fridge fits, you are getting closer to ‘game on’.
  4. They find an objection. For example, the third bedroom is a little small, yet they answer and solve their own objection quickly, “It’s ok, we can put Timmy in there, he has a single bed.”
  5. Does the (ride on mower, pool table, outdoor setting, bird bath…) come with it? Be open to saying, “Sure!”, as sometimes it the littlest of things that can tip a buyer into having a go.
  6. They ask, “Have you had any offers?” Always answer honestly. If not, “No, I haven’t.” If yes, “Yep, but we still haven’t got a deal together. The home is definitely for sale.”
  7. They go to a spot in the house or in the yard and ‘huddle’ for an extended chat. They aren’t talking about what is for dinner tonight.
  8. “What would you take for it?” This buyer is hot! This is why you need to be on your game. You ALWAYS answer with, “Make me an offer and let’s find out.”
  9. “Can I bring my (mother, father, uncle, brother, friend, cat…) to have a look with me. The old ‘second inspection’. When you agree to and arrange this, ensure you allow the buyer to sell it to their ‘advisor/trusted third party’, but be aware of and on the look-out for that third party’s objections. They have been put in a place of power by the buyer who is asking for their opinion. Still a good buying sign though.

And I’ll say it again, switch on and shut up. Let them look, watch their body language, listen to what they say and make your answers to their questions brief, friendly and informative.

This will help you determine whether or not the people looking at your home are your buyers or somebody else’s.

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The 8 Signs That They Aren’t Buying: What To Look Out For From Buyers When You Sell Your Own Home

Fact: Not every buyer you talk to or you show your home to is going to buy it.

I liken it to a funnel where buyers are poured into the top, they get mushed around and eventually one or two pop out at the end, who are real contenders.

It is a process of elimination.

Ultimately the buyer’s perception of value and their need to buy ultimately determine their intentions.

This is a Heading 2 (major sub-heading)

Fact: Not every buyer you talk to or you show your home to is going to buy it.

I liken it to a funnel where buyers are poured into the top, they get mushed around and eventually one or two pop out at the end, who are real contenders.

It is a process of elimination.

Ultimately the buyer’s perception of value and their need to buy ultimately determine their intentions.

This is a Blockquote. Yet, some buyers still slither through the cracks and have almost no intention of buying a particular property, right from the get go.

I have written extensively about qualifying buyers so you don’t waste your time and possibly theirs, and to avoid disappointment.

In my fifteen years of marketing and selling property I have a confession to make: Buyers can be fibbers.

And why do they fib? Even if they think your home might not suit them, they will still tell you what you want to hear to at least get a look.

Hey, I am a hardened and seasoned professional who has spent huge amounts of time honing my skills on qualifying buyers to ensure my clients at least know the buyer is a good chance of purchasing, and also to avoid my valuable time and that of my clients being wasted.

Yet, some buyers still slither through the cracks and have almost no intention of buying a particular property, right from the get go.

And you can tell very quickly into any inspection by what they say or do that it ‘ain’t happening’.

On more than one occasion I have felt like saying. “Ok folks, let’s wrap this up. You and I know you aren’t buying this property (or maybe any other one in the near future), so let’s not waste any more time.”

heading 3 leading in to an ordered list

Here are the ‘8 Signs’ that tell you straight away, that you should ring the bell and say, “Next!”

  1. They don’t turn up. I know that is bleeding obvious, but when they don’t respect you with a courtesy call before or after the fact – they’re not buying.
  2. If there are more than TWO decision makers, rarely can they all agree. You’ll need to be a massive optimist if you think a quick decision (or any decision) to buy, with 3 or more chiefs in the mix, is forthcoming.
  3. (One of my favourites). The buyer says, “I’ll have to go and crunch some numbers.” They’re not buying.
  4. If they say they have seen 20 properties or more, or they have been looking for more than 6 months. They are gun-shy and won’t pull the trigger anytime soon.
  5. If they say, “This is good. I’ll call you after we have a chat”, and they don’t call within 24 hours – strong chance they aren’t buying. Seriously, how long does it take to make a ‘yes or ‘no’ decision and inform someone? (If 24 hours elapses, do call them and ask how their chat went.)
  6. If one buyer enquires and inspects, and they say their partner can’t make it because “they are so busy”, you can translate that to, “I want to move/buy something but my partner doesn’t, but I’ll look anyway.”
  7. If they say, “I’ll need to talk to my financial adviser…” No hope.
  8. If they say during the inspection, “Oh, I hope I’m not taking up your time…” That is guilt and can be translated to, “I know I am not buying it but I’ll look a bit longer so the owner doesn’t feel bad.”

Now, if you want to sell your own home or are already in the process, don’t let these 8 Signs frighten you. They are here to help you.

Heading 4 (minor sub-heading)

It is just adding a bit more to your armoury so you know that EVERY buyer does not buy, and how to quickly know that those who won’t buy and have slipped through your qualification net don’t surprise and disappoint you.

heading 3 leading in to an unordered list

Here are the ‘8 Signs’ that tell you straight away, that you should ring the bell and say, “Next!”

  • They don’t turn up. I know that is bleeding obvious, but when they don’t respect you with a courtesy call before or after the fact – they’re not buying.
  • If there are more than TWO decision makers, rarely can they all agree. You’ll need to be a massive optimist if you think a quick decision (or any decision) to buy, with 3 or more chiefs in the mix, is forthcoming.
  • (One of my favourites). The buyer says, “I’ll have to go and crunch some numbers.” They’re not buying.
  • If they say they have seen 20 properties or more, or they have been looking for more than 6 months. They are gun-shy and won’t pull the trigger anytime soon.
  • If they say, “This is good. I’ll call you after we have a chat”, and they don’t call within 24 hours – strong chance they aren’t buying. Seriously, how long does it take to make a ‘yes or ‘no’ decision and inform someone? (If 24 hours elapses, do call them and ask how their chat went.)
  • If one buyer enquires and inspects, and they say their partner can’t make it because “they are so busy”, you can translate that to, “I want to move/buy something but my partner doesn’t, but I’ll look anyway.”
  • If they say, “I’ll need to talk to my financial adviser…” No hope.
  • If they say during the inspection, “Oh, I hope I’m not taking up your time…” That is guilt and can be translated to, “I know I am not buying it but I’ll look a bit longer so the owner doesn’t feel bad.”
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I’m not in a hurry to sell my house – but hang on, where are the buyers?

After 15 years in the frontlines of Real Estate, there are two statements that I wish I had of charged $10 a pop for hearing each time coming from the mouth(s) of a home seller.

This fund would have enabled me to be sitting in a private, tropical paradise, writing my memoirs whilst sipping on a breakfast cocktail – right now!

Today I am going to share #1: I’m not in a hurry to sell.

Each time I hear it, it takes enormous amounts of control and strength not to respond straight back with, “Well WHY are you selling?”

One thing I have learned in the last decade and a half in this game is – people aren’t too keen on hearing the truth.

So, I generally let that one fly through to the keeper.

The translation to this statement is not hard to figure out…

“I know, and you know, I want too much money for this place and I’m willing to wait around and waste your time, and mine, until some nuffy comes along who knows nothing about the local market and (hopefully) pays me overs to buy it.”

All too often the vendors who attempt to condition me and the market have their wishes granted.

Buyers stay away in droves and after a few weeks the inevitable terse question is asked of me by the vendor, “What have you been doing? No-one has come to look at the place. No offers!”

My courteous, yet blindingly truthful answer is always, “You said that you weren’t in a hurry.”

“I’m not, but why haven’t you brought any buyers?”

The answer to this is very simple.

If you aren’t in a hurry to sell, the market won’t be in a hurry to buy.

Buyers are always at the ready to jump on homes and property that represent good value within their price range.

They can sniff out and reject over priced homes quicker than you can say, “Where’s my sold sign?”

To sell your own home is no different to selling your car.

Say it’s time to sell the beloved family car and you place the ad on one of the big vehicle sales portals. When do you want the phone to ring with the first eager buyer?

Yesterday!!!

You expect the phone to ring off the hook right from the get go.

Well, what’s different when you plaster the internet with, I want to sell my house?

Why do you have to wait a week, two weeks, a month or longer before buyers respond?

Hitting the market right between the eyes with a well presented, good value proposition WILL get the phones ringing and email pinging straight away!

Whether you are about to sell your own home or employ an agent, don’t ignore the fact that early buyer attention and action almost always leads to the best results.

Leaving your home or property to rot on the vine through unrealistic expectations is a long and painful way to get the business done.

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Is Price the Only Factor to Consider When Negotiating to Sell Your Home?

If I asked you, “What is the real estate market all about?”, what would be your answer?

“Getting the best price.”?

“Setting a sales record.”?

“Negotiation to the death.”?

Quite simply buying and selling property is purely about destination.

It’s about getting to somewhere you want to be or moving from one place to another for a multitude of reasons.

Agents, the media and, in most cases, vendors are focussed so heavily on the price of a home or property, that getting to the desired destination is almost forgotten.

Yes, I know that too often an expectation on price is placed on the whole deal to enable a move, but this can often be a case of not seeing the wood for the trees.

Money is always something you can make back – time you cannot.

Arriving at your desired destination, in the shortest time possible by achieving the best price possible is the outcome that every home seller should be focussed on.

So, when that offer (or offers) is presented from an equally nervous buyer, it is totally instinctive that the seller focusses almost wholly and solely on the number being put forward.

And if that number is not quite hitting expectations, emotions and pride click straight into gear and the ultimate goals can be clouded or derailed based on the seller’s next reaction.

There are other factors to consider before throwing the baby out with the bath water.

Can the buyer settle quickly?

Is their previous home sold, or are they a cash buyer?

Can they get their building inspection done quickly?

Do you need a longer settlement for your move?

Can the buyers oblige here and give you a bit more time?

Whilst the price is paramount to us, the conditions that accompany the offer can be equally as important.

What if you reject the offer purely on price and it takes another few weeks or months to attract another buyer?

How much has that cost you in time and continuing mortgage payments?

Always look at a deal as a whole. Consider the price being offered in tandem with the conditions.

It may not look as bad as you first thought and an emotionless, fair minded negotiation is likely to bring together a deal that both parties can feel happy with.

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Your home hasn’t sold? The REAL reasons properties don’t sell & what to do about it

How many reasons or excuses can your rattle off as to why your home didn’t or took an eternity to sell?

Phil Spencer, the likable Pom real estate ‘guru’ says in the trailer of his show, “There’s a thousand reasons why a home doesn’t sell.” Sorry Phil, you’ve overshot the truth by about 997 reasons.

You’ve heard it here ladies and gentlemen, there are actually only THREE, well three and a half, reasons a home or property languishes on the market or frustration gets the better of the sellers and they take it off the market.

Whether you are selling your home privately or through an agent, these are the immutable laws of whether or not you are going to be slapping that SOLD sticker up or, like a beaten favourite, dragging the ‘For Sale’ sign in and using the backside of it to advertise the upcoming school fete.

The best thing about these immutable laws is that they are controlled by one person or group of people – the sellers, the owners of the home or property being sold. Yep – you have total control over these laws and can fix or adjust them at any time. And to make it easy to remember, they all start with the letter ‘P’.

PROMOTION: Reaching and attracting buyers

You can’t sell a secret. Always think of promotion (advertising) like this –

Who is the likely buyer(s) for my home? Where will I find them?

A hint for part one is, they are likely to be just like you were at the time you bought the home, and part two – it’s nearly ALL online baby!

Buyers follow property, not agents and 95{5be8b5650852dcf96a34828ba5a88d9285f6c7439f02c8133f6b05e7d943eaff} of those buyers are searching, researching and shopping online. The advertising resources you need to promote your property are almost identical if you decide to sell your own home or hire the services of an agent.

Always think BIG online as it costs a fraction of print media which now only accounts for less than 5{5be8b5650852dcf96a34828ba5a88d9285f6c7439f02c8133f6b05e7d943eaff} of total buyer enquiry.

PRESENTATION: Impressing buyers

Is the home or property Clean, Uncluttered, Tidy, and Smelling nice? – C.U.T.S.

There is no quicker way to repel a buyer than to present an untidy, cluttered, unloved home. If you don’t show that you love it, the buyer won’t either.

If it doesn’t CUTS it, you are definitely handicapping the chance of a quick, well priced sale.

Inside and out, it needs to look its absolute best.

PORTRAYAL: Attracting and meeting the expectation of buyers

Portrayal is the half a reason – extending on both presentation and promotion.

Do the images (photos) and description match what you have to offer?

Did your 16 year old niece who studied photography at TAFE for three months take six brilliant shots of the birdbath? Is the washing up still on the sink of that ‘Chef’s kitchen’ that you had installed a year ago?

One of the biggest repellents for buyers is too few photos, or poorly taken images. Four is NOT enough and thirty four is too many. The optimum number to show online (where ever buyer looks) is around 12-15 shots.

I strongly recommend hiring pro- property photographers and make sure they don’t ‘overstate’ your home. Buyers hate turning up to what they believe is the Taj Mahal and finding the Taj Mahole. Be honest and accurate with your portrayal.

Do you want to hear the biggest and often the most ignored reason why properties take ages to sell or simply don’t?!

PRICE!: Attracting and providing value for buyers

No matter if a market is hot or cold. If you over price your home or property, based on the informative power of the web, buyers will give your home a wide berth and continue to look for better value amongst your competition. And always remember this – you will always have competition.

This has been proven time and time again. Price can stop a train.

This one law would account for over 90{5be8b5650852dcf96a34828ba5a88d9285f6c7439f02c8133f6b05e7d943eaff} of stagnant or unsold properties.

A lovely client of mine called just a few days ago and asked the $64,000 question, “Craig, why hasn’t my home sold? I haven’t had anyone come to see it?”

We agreed that the other 2.5 laws had been satisfied, however, it was bleedingly obvious that the seller had overshot the runway on price, although she did try to reach for some of Phil Spencer’s imaginary 996.5 reasons why a home doesn’t sell.

She was priced at $640,000 and we agreed that a change to ‘Buyers from $600,000’ might help things along. We made the change. Within 24 hours she had her first genuine enquiry.

That horrible term ‘Drop the Price’ does not need to be used – ever. Adjusting the pricing strategy is what it’s all about. In most cases an adjustment of 2-3{5be8b5650852dcf96a34828ba5a88d9285f6c7439f02c8133f6b05e7d943eaff} and a change of how you express the price is all it takes to get buyers moving.

I have written so much about this very subject, and this hugely important law can have significant impacts on the expectations and psyche of sellers everywhere. For Agent in a Box members, you will find a video on the subject in the members area.

So there you have it, 3.5 reasons why a home or property doesn’t sell. These laws won’t change. Observe them and your next real estate selling experience will be much happier and smoother.

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The 5 BIGGEST pricing mistakes home sellers make

The sale price of any property usually falls somewhere between the sellers’ hopeful expectations and the buyers’ emotional/financial limits.

The trick to sealing the deal in the seller to buyer gap is pricing a property so that buyers don’t ignore it and see it as a ‘bridge too far’ for value compared to other similar properties in the region or area.

Even in hot markets, where buyers are competing for property, sellers who ‘overshoot the runway’ can find themselves in for a long wait, whilst other similar properties fly off the shelves.

Helping to sell other properties is what a seller actually does when they ignore what the market says about value and stubbornly stick to their expectant price.

This scenario is played out regularly all over the country, whether the owner is selling their own home or utilising an agent. (Continued below)

Did you know that around only 5{5be8b5650852dcf96a34828ba5a88d9285f6c7439f02c8133f6b05e7d943eaff} of Australia’s residential property sale market is made up of home owners who have said, “I am going to sell it myself!”?


In American and Canada that number is over 30{5be8b5650852dcf96a34828ba5a88d9285f6c7439f02c8133f6b05e7d943eaff} and even in NZ its over 10{5be8b5650852dcf96a34828ba5a88d9285f6c7439f02c8133f6b05e7d943eaff}!

Why are the vast majority of Australian Home Owners still falling into the arms of traditional agents and paying hefty commissions?

We would love to hear your thoughts.

Simply drop us a line to info@agentinabox.com.auThis email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.”>


Here are 5 pricing mistakes you should avoid when offering your home to the market.

  1. Allowing an agent to ‘buy’ your listing. Property listings are the life-blood of any agent and unskilled or less than ethical agents are only too happy to tell you a potential sale price that may have you popping the champagne – only to find out pretty quickly that the market has a completely different perception of value.
  2. Basing your property’s price on other similar properties that have NOT sold. If you believe the house up the road, which has been on the market for 4 months, is inferior to yours, therefore making yours worth more – think again.  Work off local, recent and similar SOLD properties.
  3. Getting advice from the butcher, the baker and the candlestick maker (or your uncle who was in real estate from April to September 1992) about what your place might be worth.  Unless one, or all, have bought and sold ten properties in the local area in the last six months, seek other more relevant and reliable sources of knowledge.
  4. Let’s leave the price off and see what buyers think. The first thing buyers’ think is, “This mob must want too much.”  Almost all of your enquires, especially if you are selling your own home, will be buyers asking “How much do you want for it?”…and that’s if they bother to make contact.
  5. You’ve done all the research.  Maybe you paid an independent valuer for a report, you might have asked 14 local agents in for their opinions (that’s a lot of coffee and scotch finger biscuits), you attended some open homes in the area and sussed out the competition…and you are pretty confident you know where your property needs to be priced – to sell.  But you then decide, “We’ll put another $50,000 on for negotiation.” Cue the big ‘Bow Bow’ Family Feud buzzer. It is highly likely that ‘cream’ you placed on top for ‘negotiation’ will curtail the appetite of any buyer in your price range.  Price your property to be in the market – not on it.

Pricing any property for sale can be a real balancing act – what you want as opposed to what the buyers will actually pay.

Buyers have more data and online tools at their disposal to determine what a place is worth even before they have made a phone call or set foot inside the door.

Price it right – buyers will have you in sight

Price it high – watch the buyer’s fly.

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How to disarm your buyer’s ‘Fault Finder’ when you sell your own home?

They are a suspicious lot, buyers.

Well, I suppose when you are about to spend hundreds of thousands (if not millions) on a property, you have every right to check under the hood and make sure everything works and its structurally sound.

Jeez, I would never buy a place without having a building inspector crawl all over it.

But even before a buyer gets to that stage, it’s all about inspections to see where the property is and whether it ticks off the wish-list.

Some buyers like to arm themselves with, what I like to term, an Uncle Barry.

Uncle Barry can be anyone from, well, an Uncle, a builder mate, a workmate who put up a shed in yard four years ago, to dad’s mate who sold real estate back in 1992 for 6 months.

This potential ‘fault finder’ is anointed by the buyer as their independent eye, or as I sometimes like to term it, pin the ‘expert on all things property’ badge on them.

From the moment the buyer and their entourage (Uncle Barry) set foot in the door, the buyer will defer almost any question about the structure, position and condition of the property to their expert.

And don’t some the recently appointed experts love it.

Don’t get me wrong, an independent eye and opinion can be a great help to a buyer’s decision making process, however some experts can take it up a notch or five and derail the hopes of their ‘client’, the buyer.

When you conduct an inspection when you sell your own home, always find out who the buyer has brought with them when accompanied by someone else.

“Hi Mary, thanks for coming to have a look at my house. And who is this?”
“This is my friend John.”

“Hi John. Is John buying it with you?”

“Oh no, he bought an investment recently and he is helping me.”

“Great, please take a look. Any questions do not hesitate to ask.”

Let them look, however keep a distance that allows you to be on hand and to hear any conversation between buyer and expert.

Be alert to what the expert (fault finder) may say – the buyer will take almost anything they say as gospel.

If either ask you any questions keep your answers short and to the point and direct them to both parties, make sure the expert is made to feel part of the process.

When they are finished looking, ask this question to both parties as one, “What do you think?”

If there appear to be any objections or concerns, that can be easily attended to or fixed, frame your answer this way, “Ok, with the little bit of wood rot on the deck, that is easily fixed, wouldn’t you agree John?”

Acknowledge John is wearing the expert badge and feed that importance so he can only agree with you and put his buyer friend at ease over any issue.

The key to dealing with a fault finder/expert is to identify their role early on and feed their importance.

Turn Uncle Barry into your ally not your adversary.

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How will buyers find me when I want to sell my own home?

Sorry folks, I’m afraid that ALL the Agents own ALL the buyers and you have no hope of selling unless you hire an Agent.

Haha! Gotcha!

That’s what many Agents would have you think.

Here is the Golden Rule of selling property:

Buyers follow property – not agents.

90+{5be8b5650852dcf96a34828ba5a88d9285f6c7439f02c8133f6b05e7d943eaff} of buyers today scour and search the internet (mainly realestate.com.au and domain.com.au) to find their next property.

Throw in some social media and a pinch of local papers and that is the recipe for bringing buyers and sellers together.

When a buyer (or buyers) see your property on one of the BIG property sites, they will contact the entity, organisation or person representing your home or property and ask for more information or request an inspection – by either email or a direct phone call.

If you are running open homes, the buyers may not even make contact – they will simply show up at the advertised time.

“But I want to sell my house and the agents I spoke to said they had buyers ready to go on their databases.”

That is true to an extent. The buyers on Agent A’s database are also on Agent B, C, D & E’s databases.

No Agent ever owns a buyer. Trying to control buyer behaviour and activity is like trying to herd cats!

I liken the story woven by many agents to putting an image in the mind of prospective home sellers that each agent has a mystery cave in the hills full of ravenous and starving buyers. And when your home comes onto the market, he or she trots up the hill with a magic key, unlocks the gates to the cave and plucks out the most desperate buyer in the cave and skips back down the hill to your place – sold!

Fact of the matter is – serious buyers are online searching for properties, not Agents.

So, if you are selling your own home with an online Agency such as Agent in a Box, your property is promoted on the BIG sites and when a buyer is interested in your home, they call or email Agent in A Box and the buyers’ details are forwarded to you, the seller, promptly to enable you to talk to and engage the buyer.

In the last three or four years buyers have become so much more accustomed to dealing directly with the vendors of For Sale By Owner properties and in almost all cases prefer to deal with the owners one-on-one.

The internet now empowers ANY home owner to take control of the sale of their own property and attract buyers to engage and deal with.

In a nutshell – They will find you!

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Should I Run Open Homes When I Sell My House?

This is one of the most asked questions by those who are thinking about embarking on a sell you own home journey.

I could wind it up right here with the answer to the headline question with a resounding, “Yes!” – but I’ll explain a little further why open homes are an important part of any marketing campaign.

In capital cities and most regional areas, buyers almost expect that the property that piques their interest will be open for inspection at some stage.

With the hundreds and hundreds of email enquiries that we see monthly, one of the most common questions asked by buyers is, “When is the property open next?”

Many buyers are time poor, and it they prefer to head to their area of choice on, say, a Saturday and schedule a batch of open for inspections on the homes that interest them the most.

What I know through my 15 years of marketing and sales experience is that a few home sellers still believe that open homes attract ‘sticky beaks’.

Yes, the odd ‘sticky beak’ might come along, possibly a neighbour, but for every one of them you will have 5-10 serious lookers who are actually in the market or researching it.

So, to get in you in the mood to ‘Open up’ when you sell your own home, here are a couple of quick tips for running a successful open home:

  • Set your open home for no longer than 45 minutes. The more buyers crammed in and feeling the competition the better.
  • Advertise the open home at least 4 days beforehand e.g. Saturday open home, promote it by the previous Wednesday.
  • Ensure your Sign and Pointers are our out early on the morning of the open home.
  • Present your home within an inch of it’s life. Leave nothing to chance.
  • Make sure EVERY attendee is greeted at the door and their details recorded.

For the A-Z of running a great Open Home, we have a comprehensive guide in our Tool Box – Phase 5: Engaging Buyers.

Making your home accessible to buyers through open homes and inspections by appointment is critical in flushing out that ONE buyer who is willing to do the deal that you hoped for from the start.

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